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Friday, November 30, 2012

VOTE NOW! Should Republicans try to stop Obama's tax increases? | Sponsored by Independent Living News

VOTE NOW! Should Republicans try to stop Obama's tax increases? | Sponsored by Independent Living News
In remarks on the Senate floor today, Alabama senator Jeff Sessions blasted President Barack Obama and congressional leadership for holding "secret" fiscal cliff negotiations.
"I rise today to express my reservations about the fiscal cliff negotiations that are currently underway," said Sessions. "Over the last two years, Congress and the President have held an endless series of secret negotiations. There have been gangs of six and eight, a supercommittee of 12, talks at the Blair House and the White House. But the only thing these secret talks have produced is a government that skips from one crisis to the next. Everything has been tried but the open production of a 10-year budget plan as required by law and open discussions of the difficult choices."
Sessions, the highest Republican on the Senate Budget Committee, saved most of his criticism for the president. "President Obama campaigned on a tax increase of ‘only’ $800 billion," said Sessions. "But now the White House is demanding $1.6 trillion in new taxes. Don’t the American people have a right to see these taxes and where they will fall? Shouldn’t the President of the United States, the only person who represents everybody in the country, lay out his plan, or must that remain a secret too? Will it just be revealed to us on the eve of Christmas or eve of the new calendar year? We will be asked to vote for it, to ratify it like lemmings, I suppose."
The Alabama senator insisted Obama is not serious about cutting spending--or cutting government waste.
In fact, the President is giving speeches calling for even more spending. On Tuesday, he gave a speech in which he said he wants to use the tax hikes to ‘invest in training, education, science, and research.’ Investment, of course, is just code for spending.

Thursday, November 29, 2012

MinnesotaJusticeDaleNathan_LawlessAmerica_BillWindsorVideo's

http://www.youtube.com/user/lawlessamerica/videos?query=minnesota www.mncourtreform.org

Thanks Dale Nathan et al for Staying Active Someone has to make the MN Judiciary
Accountable 

Search results for "minnesota":

Thurs.29Nov2012 Nathan's Horror Storys reposted in the event site is taken down. Sharons' Mission Statement is to expose and Abolish SCAP Commitment Panel chaired by Lesbian Judge Joanne Smith et al.
NEWS RELEASE REP.BOB GOODLATTE(R-VA) CHAIR HOUSE
JUDICIARY
Affidavit of Candidate 4MNAG_Sharon Anderson aka 1sHusband In re Scarrella4Justice221NW2d www.sharon4judge.blogspot.com www.lawlessamerica.com exposing Judicial Corruption in MN the USA.
Legal Notice to MN State DFL Governor Mark Dayton, DFL
Attorney General Lori Swanson, Affiant is working on exposing Further
Judicial Corruption found at www.sharonsenate64.blogspot.com
Click here: Goodlatte to Tackle Range of Issues at House Judiciary Committee - The BLT: The Blog of Legal Times

Goodlatte to Tackle Range of Issues at House Judiciary Committee

Representative Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) has been elected to serve as chairman of the House Judiciary Committee when the 113th Congress convenes in January, putting him in the center of issues like antitrust, immigration reform and Department of Justice oversight.
Thanks4Posting Dale Nathan www.youtube.com/lawlessamerica
reposted at www.sharon4mnag.blogspot.com Affiant agree's with Nathan's Horror Storys must update
Bill Windsor your Wonderful Nathan has Issues re: Life Style
his www.mncourtreform.org
Sh Minnesota Injustice True Horror Cases
The following is a list of the horror case digests contained in this website. Click on a title you are interested in reading. This are case digests only. The case summaries in Minnesota Injustice contain much more information about each case.
James H. Clark, Jr. Ramsey County Judge
John F. Connelly, Ramsey County Judge
Joanne M. Smith, Ramsey County Judge
Teresa R. Warner, Ramsey County Judge
Paul Magnuson, Former Chief Judge, U.S. District Court for Minnesota
Anthony McWell, Ramsey County Child Protection Worker
Ann O. Ploetz, Assistant Ramsey County Attorney
Karen J. Garvin, Assistant Public Defender, Ramsey County
Julie Russomanno, Guardian Ad Litem
Minnesota Supreme Court
Minnesota Appeals Court Judges Bruce Willis, Gordon W. Shumaker, Edward J. Parker
Thomas H. Carey, Hennepin County Judge (retired in Florida)
Court of Appeals Judges Harvey Holtan, Edward Toussaint, Jr., Robert H. Schumacher
Timothy Blakely, Scott County Judge
William E. Macklin, Scott County Judge
Michael A. Young, Scott County Judge
Thomas R. Howe, Scott County Judge
R. Kathleen Morris, Attorney, Scott County, Parenting Time Investigator
Linda Gerr, Guardian Ad Litem
The Ugly Liquor Store
Chisago District Court File No. C4961042
Court of Appeals File No. C1-96-2290
Timothy J. McManus, Dakota County Judge
James M. Rosenbaum, Chief Judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota
The Vanishing Builders
Dakota County District Court File No. 19-C5-96-6450
Court of Appeals File No. C1-98-107
Minnesota Federal District Court File No. 4-92-247
Federal Court of Appeals File No. 94-2363MNST
Timothy J. McManus, Dakota County Judge
James M. Rosenbaum, Chief Judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota
The Tortured Children
Winona County District Court File No. F4-89-52
Buffalo County, Wisconsin Juvenile Court file Nos. 98-JC-16, 17, 18
Ramsey County District Court File No. 62-F7-00-000092
Wisconsin Federal District Court File No. 99-CV-00148-S
Dennis A. Challeen, retired Winona District Judge
Donna Thethewey, Ramsey County Referee
Robert Fletcher, Ramsey County Sheriff
David May, Former Ramsey County Director of Child Protection
Judge Dane Morey, Buffalo County, Wisconsin Judge of Circuit Court
Ann M. Yelle, Stuart I. Berg, Buffalo County child protection officials
James Duvall, Buffalo County Attorney
Mark Perron, Ramsey County Assistant County Attorney
Brian Magruder, Ramsey County Human Services Department
John C. Shabaz, Wisconsin Federal District Court Judge
David C. Rice, Wisconsin Assistant Attorney General
The Billion Dollar Heist
Minnesota Federal District Court Files No. 3-94-661, 4-95-676, 4-96-113, 4-95-1155
Federal Court of Appeals File No. 97-2969MNMI
John R. Tunheim, federal district court judge
Ann Montgomery, federal district court judge (former U.S. Magistrate)
Jonathan Lebedoff, U.S. Magistrate
Raymond L. Erickson, U.S. Magistrate
Federal Appeals Court Judges James B. Loken (Chief Judge), Gerald W. Heaney, Pasco M. Bowman II, (former Chief Judge)
The Desperate Mother
Ramsey County District Court File No. FX-95-777
Minnesota Court of Appeals Files Nos. C2-95-1557 and C2-98-777
Earl F. Beddow, Jr., Ramsey County Referee
Paulette K. Flynn, Ramsey County Judge
Mary E. McGinnis, Ramsey County Referee
M. Michael Monohan, Ramsey County Judge
Gregg E. Johnson, Ramsey County Judge
Edward Toussaint, Jr., Chief Judge, Minnesota Court of Appeals
William Moore, Family Court Officer
Sex With Animals
Pennington County District Court File No. FX-02-166; Minnesota Court of Appeals File No. C6-03-278
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennington County Judge
Minnesota Court of Appeals, Judges Roger M. Klaphake, Randolph W. Peterson, David Minge
The Judge Who Squelched Free Speech
Republican Party of Minnesota v. White, 63 F.Supp.2d 967; 247 F.3d 854

Michael J. Davis, federal district court Judge
The Road To Nowhere
Becker County District Court File No. 03-C4-99-000696
Minnesota Court of Appeals File No. C9-02-216
Thomas P. Schroeder, Becker County District Court Judge
Gretchen P. Thelmony, Becker County Attorney's Office
The Big Surprise
Dakota County District Court File No. 19-C7-98-7233
Karen Asphaug, Dakota County Judge
The Cops From Hell
Brown County District Court File No. K7-03-855
John R. Rodenberg, Brown County Judge
Jason Fairbairn, Brown County Deputy Sheriff
Peter McGarry, Sleepy Eye Police Officer
Tim Brennen, Brown County Sheriff
Jeremy Brennen, Brown County Deputy Sheriff
Melanie D. Cook, Minnesota State Trooper
Jered D. Peterson, Assistant Brown County Attorney
James R. Olson, County Attorney Brown County
Jill Hady, Brown County Probation Officer
The Young Mummy (6 years old)
There is no court file because a file was never opened
Plaintiffs' Trial Lawyers
The Godzilla Conspiracy
Federal District Court File Nos. 4-91-638 and 4-91-438
Joan N. Ericksen (formerly Joan Ericksen Lancaster), federal district court judge
James H. Gilbert, Minnesota Supreme Court Justice
Jonathan Lebedoff, federal district court magistrate
Ronald J. Meshbesher, criminal lawyer
The Purloined Heart
Pennington County District Court File No. C1-98-342
Larry G. Jorgenson, Pennington County Judge (retired)
The Jekyll and Hyde Mother
Ramsey County District Court File No. F9-01-00-001660
John B. Van de North, Ramsey County Judge Sandy Warner, Guardian Ad Litem
The Infant Trade
Hennepin County Juvenile Court File No. 241840
Michelle Hatcher, Assistant Hennepin County Attorney
Diane Kassler, Hennepin County Child Protection Worker
Myron S. Greenberg, Hennepin County Juvenile Court Judge
Christine Litsey, Guardian Ad Litem
Eric S. Rehm, Attorney for the Guardian Ad Litem
Insanity in Wonderland
Ramsey County District Court File No. F7-94-115
Minnesota Appellate Court File No. C6-02-996
Kathleen Gearin, Ramsey County Judge
Annemarie Suchta, Ramsey County Family Court Officer
Minnesota Appeals Court Judges Bruce Willis, Robert H. Schumacher, G. Barry Anderson
Minnesota Supreme Court Appeal denied by Justice Alan Page
The Suspicious Trunk Lock
Ramsey County District Court File No. K6-01-600010
Russell Platzek, Falcon Heights Prosecutor
The Cursed Home
Hennepin District Court Files No. UD: 1981124512; CT00-2561; CT00-9544
David M. Duffy, Hennepin County Judge
Citizens State Bank of Gaylord, Minnesota
Other Horror Cases In Brief The Family Room Floor
Hennepin County District Court File No. CT98-014258

The Slippery Verdict
Ramsey County District Court File No. C1-96-6495

The Cabinetmaker Who Was Too Patient
Scott County District Court File No. 1998-14846

The Unbelievable Minister
Hennepin County District Court File No. LN 97-005596

The Meaningless Promise
Ramsey County District Court File No. 62-99-001907

Judge Roulette
Dakota County District Court File No. 19-C7-98-7233

Judge Obstinacy
Dakota County District Court File No. 19-C7-98-7233

The Little Boys Who Hated Their Father
Ramsey County District Court File No. 62-F7-99-344
Ann Leslie Alton, Hennepin County Judge

Michael F. Fetsch, Ramsey County Judge

Thomas R. Howe, Scott County Judge


Robert H. Lynn, Hennepin County Judge


M. Michael Monohan, Ramsey County Judge

Thomas M. Murphy, Dakota County Judge

Michael V. Sovis, Dakota County Judge

Joanne M. Smith, Ramsey County Judge

The Desperate Mother
Earl F. Beddow, Jr., Ramsey County Referee
Paulette K. Flynn, Ramsey County Judge
Mary E. McGinnis, Ramsey County Referee
Gregg E. Johnson, Ramsey County Judge

Edward Toussaint, Jr., Chief Judge, Minnesota Court of Appeals

Mother, an immigrant who was in the United States on a student, visa was so physically abused by her alcoholic husband that she took their child and fled to a woman's shelter. Even though she was at the shelter for months, and the shelter confirmed the abuse, judges and referees did nothing because the mother was unable to produce a witness who actually saw her husband beat her. Because she was in the United States on a student visa, it was illegal for her to work to support herself and her child. Referees Earl F. Beddow, Jr., and Mary E. McGinnis, and Judges Paulette K. Flynn and M. Michael Monahan refused to award her anything for temporary child support or alimony.

Because a trial in her case was months away, Mother made an emergency appeal to the Minnesota Court of Appeals. Chief Judge Edward Toussaint, Jr., turned down Mother's appeal for emergency relief because she had not sent an affidavit (sworn statement of the facts) with her appeal, even though such an affidavit was in the court file. Judge Toussaint did not bother to ask for an affidavit to support the appeal. He was insensitive to Mother's situation and the danger to the child of losing her mother.

A legal aid lawyer finally won permanent residency status for her so she could stay in the United States and be with her child. Financially broke and with no way to pay her lawyer, she agreed to give her husband the home they had purchased and all of their proper ty, and settled for $100 per month child support - far less than she needed to provide for herself and her child. Judge Gregg E. Johnson approved the settlement.
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The Judge Who Makes House Calls
Thomas H. Carey, Hennepin County Judge (retired in Florida)

A prominent Hennepin County couple (Buyers) made a contract with a builder (Builder) to build a luxury home for them in Minnetonka, Minnesota. Builder made a contract with Painter to provide materials and paint the interior and exterior of the home. Painter finished all his work, which was inspected and accepted by Builder's construction superintendent (later fired by Builder). Painter had been paid part of the subcontract price, but was owed an additional $20,000. But the cost to build the home was almost $1 million, far over Buyers' budget, who were short of money. After Builder refused to pay Painter the $20,000 balance due him, Painter filed a mechanic's lien on the home. Buyers used a falsified closing statement to close around the mechanic's lien.

When the judge learned that Painter's claim was for "only" $20,000, he demanded that the case be settled. He did not want to waste his time on a small claim. He refused to allow a claim of fraud based on the falsified mechanic's lien. Buyers refused to offer anything to Painter and he asserted his right to a trial. During trial, the judge decided to personally inspect the home as part of the trial (in effect making himself a witness), even though it had been over a year since Painter had painted it. At Buyers' home Judge Carey was taken on a tour by Buyers who pointed out deficiencies they said had been there since they had moved in (which was before the alleged correction of Painter's work).

Judge Carey found as a fact that Builder's employees had corrected alleged deficiencies in Painter's work and deducted the amount claimed by Builder for the correction work from the amount claimed by Painter. He also found that Painter's alleged deficiencies still existed even though Builder's employee claimed he had corrected these deficiencies. On the basis of his findings of fact, the judge denied Painter recovery of any of the $20,000 balance claimed by Painter and fined his attorney $20,000 because, despite five witnesses including the discharged construction superintendent, he said the case was completely without merit and never should have gone to trial. The Minnesota Court of Appeals reversed the fine against Painter's lawyer, but refused to reverse the decision against Painter because the trial court is the sole judge of credibility of witnesses, even though there were glaring discrepancies in Judge Carey's findings of fact. Painter never received anything for his materials and labor.
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The Terrified Little Girl (4 years old)
Timothy Blakely, Scott County Judge
William E. Macklin, Scott County Judge
Michael A. Young, Scott County Judge
Thomas R. Howe, Scott County Judge
R. Kathleen Morris, Attorney, Scott County, Parenting Time Investigator


Mother and Husband, married close to forty years with several grown children, had a falling out and separated. During the few months they were apart, Mother had an affair with Father, a co-worker at the place where she worked. She and Husband reunited. Later, she found she was pregnant. A few months later, Daughter was born. Father found out and demanded to know if Daughter was his child. A paternity test proved that he was the father of Daughter. Father urged Mother to leave Husband and live with him with Daughter. Mother refused. Father went to court to force Mother to give him visitation with Daughter. A court appointed Guardian Ad Litem investigated, found Father to be unstable, and recommended supervised visitation, which the court ordered to take place at a children's safety center. The court also ordered Father to pay child support, which he refused to do.

After several months of bitter controversy, Father went back to court. The court found Mother in contempt for not giving Father the visitation it had ordered and put Mother in jail for several hours. After that, Mother literally dragged Daughter to visit with Father at the children's safety center. Daughter was terrified of him. She said he told her terrible things that scared her, that she was going to come live with him. Once, she reported that Father had touched her private parts, but Daughter, then three years old, would not repeat this allegation to a child abuse clinic at that time. (Later, when she was four years, Daughter told a child psychologist about the incident, who documented this in a report.)

Once and sometimes twice a week, Mother, or a member of her family, dragged Daughter, crying and screaming, to visit Father. She sometimes locked herself in her room to avoid having to go. She was whipsawed for months between Mother and Father. Eventually, the case was assigned to Dakota County Judge Timothy Blakely. He determined that Daughter should have unsupervised visitation with Father on weekends at Father's home. Mother contested this order. She and members of her family told Judge Blakely this would severely hurt Daughter. On the recommendation of her lawyer, Mother took Daughter to a very reputable child psychologist who spent several sessions evaluating Daughter. She reported that Daughter had great fear and distress in her relationship with Father and that forcing Daughter to have unsupervised visitation with Father would cause severe emotional damage. She recommended that she work with Father and Daughter to work through the child's feelings and develop a relationship between her and him that was in her best interests. Judge Blakely refused to hear the child psychologist's testimony.

Judge Blakely appointed R. Kathleen Morris to be a parenting investigator to recommend the visitation Father should be given with Daughter. Ms. Morris is a former County Attorney of Scott County. While county attorney, she charged many Scott County parents with sexually abusing their children and put their children in foster care. Ms. Morris was defeated when she ran for re-election as county attorney. On the recommendation of Ms. Morris, Judge Blakely ordered unsupervised visitation by Daughter with Father all of the weekend on most weekends and holidays during the year. He put Mother in jail for several weeks because she refused to comply with his order while she appealed his ruling to the Minnesota Court of Appeals. That court rejected Mother's appeal, as did the Minnesota Supreme Court. Daughter now spends almost every weekend with Father, whom she detests, in a cabin in north Minnesota that lacks hot water and toilet facilities (Daughter must use an outhouse) where she sits on a couch almost all of every weekend. She has no contact on weekends with her friends.
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The Ugly Liquor Store
Thomas O. Hayes, Anoka County Judge

Lindstrom, Minnesota, wanted to build a new liquor store. A member of the City Council leaded information to a political supporter that gave him an advantage over other bidders. He informed his supporter, who submitted the second low bid, on the design that he city council favored. The City Council awarded the contract to the second low bidder and rejected the bid of the low bidder, even though it met all specification requirements, on the basis that it liked the second bidder's design better. The low bidder sued. Judge Hayes, though, approved the award to the second low bidder. The Minnesota Court of Appeals reversed Judge Hayes following a long and expensive appeal by the low bidder. This victory, however, came after the new liquor store had been built. Judge Hayes then awarded the low bidder the costs it incurred in preparing and submitted its proposal. Lindstrom taxpayers paid these costs as well as the higher price for the new liquor store, which far exceeded the original low bid.
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The Vanishing Builders
Timothy J. McManus, Dakota County Judge

James Rosenbaum, Chief Judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota
A scheme perpetrated by a major Minnesota lumber company through an unregulated private bank it created deprived hundreds of subcontractors of payment for their labor and materials. The private bank was entirely owned by the lumber company. A national bank loaned the lumber company bank scores of millions of dollars that it then loaned to builders to finance the construction of homes. It made loans to financially weak builders that could not qualify for construction loans from commercial banks which are regulated by federal and state agencies. Interest rates charged by the lumber company bank were substantially higher than those of commercial banks and the lumber company bank charged thousands more in fees and carrying costs.

The proceeds of each loan were retained and controlled by the lumber company bank and paid only when it approved a payment. Products purchased from the owners of the lumber company bank always were paid for in full. The builders always were paid for its work, sometimes an obviously excessive amount. Sometimes, proceeds of a loan were used to pay the lumber company amounts owed for materials used on other construction projects. Many of the financially weak builders completed construction of one or more homes financed by the lumber company bank and then declared bankruptcy, went out of business, or simply disappeared. The lumber company bank foreclosed on its construction loan mortgage which generally used up all the equity in the home. There was nothing left to pay subcontractors for their labor and materials. The percentage of loans made by the lumber company bank to financially weak builders that went into default was five times as high as the rate for regulated commercial banks.

One of the subcontractors sued the lumber company and its bank for racketeering under a federal law. Federal Judge James Rosenbaum, now Chief Judge of the United States Court for the District of Minnesota, demanded that the complaint, the documents that started the lawsuit, be re-written again and again. It didn't have enough detail for him to see the fraud. He threw the lawsuit out of his court because he was never satisfied with the complaint. The subcontractor sued in Minnesota state court under a state law that provides relief for fraud. Judge Timothy McManus threw this suit out of his court without letting it go before a jury. He said there were no facts in dispute. The lumber company bank was simply foreclosing on its mortgages. The Minnesota Court of Appeals affirmed Judge McManus' ruling. Chief Justice Kathleen Blatz and the rest of the Supreme Court of Minnesota refused to review the matter. Company got away with its frauds. It still is making high risk loans to financially weak builders and defrauding subcontractors out of payment for their labor and materials. After the subcontractor's appeals were denied, Judge McManus awarded judgment against the subcontractor for thousands of dollars of costs, including over $5,000 for the work of an expert who never even testified.
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The Tortured Children
Dennis A. Challeen, retired Winona District Judge
Donna Thethewey, Ramsey County Referee
Robert Fletcher, Ramsey County Sheriff
David May, Ramsey County Director of Child Protection


After years of beatings and abuse by her husband, Mother divorced him. Custody of the couple's three children was awarded to Mother. Father, who did not work and received social security disability income (SSI), refused to pay any child support. Mother, who did work, could not make ends meet. She made a serious mistake. She sold some marijuana to an undercover officer. She was sent to jail and custody of her children was transferred to Father. He tortured the children. He beat them, forced the two girls to watch pornography, refused to provide them with adequate clothing and other necessities, and often left them alone. His home was filthy, lacking hot water, and frequently lacking food. Conditions became so bad that a county child protection worker filed a CHIPS (Child In need of Protective Services) petition charging Father with child abuse. An exhibit attached to the petition reporter that Father showed his son movies of naked women having intercourse, repeatedly hit the girls, that there was little to eat in the home, that the children often were left without supervision, that the home often was cold in the winter time because the wood furnace had died out, and that one of the children was found by her school to have head lice.

A criminal complaint filed by the sheriff charged Father with engaging in violent, abusive, indecent, profane, boisterous, unreasonably loud and otherwise disorderly behavior and bodily harm to his children. Father pleaded no contest to these charges. However, he was allowed to keep custody of the children even though Mother had completed her jail time and begged for the return of her children. Later, Mother moved for an investigation. The court appointed a licensed social worker to be the children's Guardian Ad Litem (a person who investigates and reports to the court on children involved in a legal proceeding). She told the court in a report that the children were struggling in school, that the oldest girl had made repeated reports of abuse by Father, that clearly there were problems in Father's home, and that the children's schools considered Father to be a problem parent.Despite all this, the court refused to change custody.

One night, after more serious abuse, the children called Mother, and ran from Father's home to a meeting place where Mother picked them up and fled to her home in St. Paul. The next day, Ramsey County Deputy Sheriffs, with the co-operation of Ramsey County Child Protection, picked up the children and returned them to Father's county where they were put into separate foster homes. Several months later, despite Father's refusal to co-operate, and strong warnings by social workers that Father was a danger to his children, the court returned the children to Father. Three months later, after more beatings and torture, the children ran again to Mother's home. A new child protection worker finally determined that the children should be with Mother and left them in her home. The county that put the children in foster care then forced Mother to pay thousands of dollars for the cost of foster care.
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The Billion Dollar Heist
John R. Tunheim, federal district court judge
Ann Montgomery, federal district court judge (former U.S. Magistrate)
Jonathan Lebedoff, U.S. Magistrate
Raymond L. Erickson, U.S. Magistrate
Federal Appeals Court Judges:
James B. Loken (Chief Judge), Gerald W. Heaney, Pasco M. Bowman II, (former Chief Judge)


A government contractor bilked taxpayers out of more than a billion dollars by giving false information to the United States Navy that led the Navy to buy 1980's era computers at a price of $1 million each even though modern era computers with superior capability were available for less than $10,000 each. Judge John Tunheim, with the Navy's cooperation, dismissed the suit brought an employee who was fired because he would not participate in a scheme to cheat the government. Judge Tunheim and other court officials covered up the fraud. On the recommendation of U.S. Magistrate Jonathan Lebedoff, Judge Tunheim penalized the employee and his lawyer for trying to expose the fraud. Before he was appointed to the federal bench, Judge Tunheim was a member of a group that investigated the assination of President John F. Kennedy. He reported that a single, illiterate, emotionally disturbed vagrant was solely responsible for killing President Kennedy. In a whistleblower case started by the employee, the then United States Attorney, David L. Lillehaug, refused to prosecute in return for a political favor.
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The Young Sex Perverts (ages 4 and 6)
James H. Clark, Jr. Ramsey County Judge
John F. Connelly, Ramsey County Judge
Joanne M. Smith, Ramsey County Judge
Teresa R. Warner, Ramsey County Judge
Paul Magnuson, Former Chief Judge, U.S. District Court for Minnesota
Anthony McWell, Ramsey County Child Protection Worker
Ann O. Ploetz, Assistant Ramsey County Attorney
Karen J. Garvin, Assistant Public Defender, Ramsey County
Minnesota Appeals Court Judges Bruce Willis, Gordon W. Shumaker, Edward J. Parker
Minnesota Supreme Court - Appeal denied by Justice Alan Page


After years of being beaten and raped, often in front of her children, Mother could take it no more. She broke the relationship with the man who was the father of her two youngest children. Although she worked full time, she was unable to find an apartment for herself and her four children that she could afford. She asked Ramsey County for temporary help.

The child protection worker took charge of Mother and her four children who went to foster homes. He told Mother she had to go to counseling with the man who had abused her if she wanted her children back. He did not understand that a battered woman wants nothing to do with her batterer. The child protection worker told Mother she was refusing to cooperate. Then he found out that Mother, a white woman, was dating a black man. He told Mother to stick to her own kind. He put Mother's two oldest children in permanent foster care and began the process to terminate Mother's parental rights to her two youngest children.

Over Mother's vigorous objections, the child protection worker arranged for Mother's four children to be alone in the apartment of the man who had battered and raped Mother. The batterer raped Mother's 12 year old daughter. The child protection worker blamed Mother for that, returned the children to foster homes, and cut off all contact between Mother and her four children.

Months later the child protection worker allowed Mother unsupervised visitation with her now 13 year old daughter, which went very well, and supervised visitation with her two youngest children. Mother asked that she have unsupervised visitation with her two youngest children on weekends. She wanted to prove that she could parent her two youngest children just as she was parenting her oldest child when she was allowed to. Everyone agreed that Mother was living in a home that was suitable for her children. But the child protection worker had decided to terminate Mother's parental rights to her two youngest children. The trial was about to start and he was not going to give Mother any chance to regain custody of her children. He contacted the child psychologist who was providing counseling to Mother's two youngest children, then ages 4 and 6. This child psychologist got over 90% of her business from Ramsey County. Even though she had never even met Mother, she recommended that Mother have only supervised visitation with her two youngest children because they were sex perverts. She blamed Mother for this even though the girls had been in foster care for one and one-half years.

Judge James H. Clark, Jr., fully aware of the child protection worker's racism and other abuses, terminated Mother's parental rights to her two youngest children.

Mother appealed Judge Clark's decision to the Minnesota Court of Appeals. Among other arguments, she pointed out that Judge Clark's decision was not supported by the facts. Appeals Court Judge Bruce Willis Lied when he wrote in his opinion that Mother had not made substantial progress in her individual therapy with a psychologist, who was highly respected and had a Ph.D. This psychologist testified that Mother had progressed substantially and further that her emotional condition did not render her unfit to parent her children. Judge Willis' real gripe was that Mother did not go to one of the psychologists recommended by the child protection worker, but rather to a psychologist she selected and trusted. Appeals Court Judges Gordon W. Schumacher and Edward J. Parker joined Judge Willis in his untruthfulness.

Mother appealed from the appeals court to the Minnesota Supreme Court. On behalf of that court, Justice Allen Page denied Mother's appeal without comment.

Judges Joanne Smith and Teresa R. Warner gave Ramsey County the right to permanently separate Mother from her other two children. Mother is not allowed to have any contact with her children, nor they with her.
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The Big Surprise
Karen Asphaug, Dakota County Judge

After a builder went into bankruptcy, the bank that loaned money to the builder to finance the construction of a home foreclosed its mortgage. The home, which was being built for a senior couple, was redeemed by four subcontractors who had filed mechanic's liens on the home. They became co-owners of the home, which was not quite finished. One of the subcontractors who became one of the owners was Plumber. The co-owners completed construction of the home and the senior couple for whom the home had been build moved in on a lease. At the same time, three of the co-owners sued to have Plumber's ownership interest declared invalid on the basis that his mechanic's lien had been defective. Plumber counter-sued for damages on the basis that the other co-owners had breached the agreement all had signed and wrongfully deprived Plumber of his share of the rent paid by the senior couple. the first trial was only on Plumber's interest in the home.

The judge ruled in the first trial that Plumber's mechanic's lien had been valid and that Plumber had an ownership interest in the home. The second trial was supposed to be on Plumber's counterclaim. It was scheduled to begin on a Monday. Late in the afternoon on the Friday before trial, the lawyer for the other three co-owners raised a new issue: what was each co-owner percentage interest in the home since their mechanic's liens had been for different amounts although each co-owner had paid the same amount for its ownership interest. Plumber argued that this was not fair notice and that he was not prepared to try that issue and had not had time to subpoena witnesses or prepare exhibits to submit into evidence.

The judge refused to give Plumber more time and began the trial on the Monday as scheduled. She ruled in favor of the three co-owners by awarding them much higher ownership interests than Plumber. After close to a year and much more expense, the Minnesota Court of Appeals reversed the judge on the basis that one business day notice of raising a new issue was lack of due process. The senior couple who had paid thousands of dollars to the builder before he went bankrupt, and more thousands of dollars for legal services, lost all their investment and had to move out of the home.
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The Judge Who Squelched Free Speech
Michael J. Davis, Minnesota Federal District Court Judge

A lawyer named Greg Wersal wanted to run against an incumbent Justice on the Minnesota Supreme Court. He wanted to replace the incumbent judge and become one of the seven Minnesota Supreme Court Justices.

As part of his campaign, Wersal criticized the Minnesota Supreme Court. In one campaign handout he stated that the Minnesota Supreme Court "has issued decisions which are marked by their disregard for the Legislature and a lack of common sense."
Wersal criticized a decision that excluded evidence confessions by criminal defendants that were not tape-recorded, asking if people should "conclude that because the Supreme Court does not trust police, it allows confessed criminals to go free?"

He criticized a decision by the Minnesota Supreme Court that struck down a state law restricting welfare benefits and said it is "the Legislature which should set our spending policies."

Wersal called a decision by the Minnesota Supreme Court that required public financing of abortions for poor women "unprecedented" and a "pro-abortion stance."

Officials of the Minnesota State government contacted Wersal. They told him he was violating a rule made by the Minnesota Supreme Court. The rule made it illegal for a candidate for judge or justice to state his or her views on disputed legal or political issues.

The reason for the rule according to the Minnesota Supreme Court was to make sure judges justices have an open mind on all issues. The officials who contacted Wersal threatened to take away his license to be a lawyer if he kept trying to tell voters his positions on disputed legal or political issues. It was all right, according to these officials, for Wersal to criticize the Minnesota Supreme Court and its decisions as long as he agreed to do nothing to change them.

Afraid of losing his license and right to be a lawyer, Wersal withdrew from as a candidate for Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court. He sued in federal district court for a ruling that the rule prohibiting him from speaking on disputed legal or political issues be set aside. Wersal argued that it was unconstitutional because it limited free speech.

Lawyers representing the State of Minnesota told federal district court Judge Michael J. Davis that the limits what a candidate for judge or justice could say were necessary to protect the due process rights of parties in court. They said it assured that justices and judges would be impartial and open-minded. Judge Davis agreed. He ruled that Mr. Wersal could not tell voters his views on disputed legal or political issues if he was a candidate for judge or justice.

Wersal appealed to a federal appeals court. By a vote of two to one it upheld Judge Davis. Wersal then appealed to the United States Supreme Court. In a 5-4 decision (the U.S.Supreme Court has nine justices), it told Judge Davis and the appeals court they were wrong. Candidates for political office, including candidates for judge or justice, have the constitutional right to tell voters their positions on disputed legal and political issues.

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The Jekyll and Hyde Mother

John B. Van de North, Ramsey County Judge

Even though Judge John B. Van de North knew Mother had custody of her six month old daughter, whom he personally saw at trial, and heard substantial evidence that Mother was doing an excellent job of raising her daughter by herself in her own apartment, he found Mother unfit to parent her three year old son and awarded custody of him to an almost sixty year old single foster mother who was a blood stranger to the boy.

At age 18, just after she gave birth to Son, Mother was unsettled. She lived in a noisy, messy apartment, moved often, partied more than she should have, and used marijuana and alcohol in more than moderation. She was from a dysfunctional home, had not completed high school, and worked only occasionally. Her large family helped care for Son and because of that he was healthy, well fed and clothed, always watched and kept safe, and happy.

But Ramsey County child protection was concerned. A child protection worker started a proceeding in Ramsey County Juvenile Court to make sure Son was protected. Mother put Son in foster care for a short time, but decided to get him back and the child protection worker helped Mother retrieve Son from the foster home.

The child protection worker wanted Mother to be evaluated and Mother agreed to that. She was sent to a psychologist selected and paid for by Ramsey County, who gets 90% of her business from Ramsey County social workers and rarely makes findings or recommendations not agreeable to the agency. The psychologist found that Mother was mildly retarded, immature, aimless and irresponsible and recommended against Mother having custody of Son. Two other evaluations, again selected and paid for by Ramsey County, came to the same conclusion.

At about that time, Mother settled down. She was not happy with her style of life. She went back to school, began training to be a commercial cook, stopped all use of alcohol and drugs, and lived responsibly. She became much more mature. Mother proved all of that at trial.

In the meantime, the foster mother who had cared for Son decided she wanted Son permanently and the assistance she received when he was in her care. She started a lawsuit in Ramsey County Family Court and asked that she be given the permanent custody of Son. She persuaded the court to give her temporary custody of Son. Later, the court dismissed the juvenile court action and went forward in the family court lawsuit which meant there were no child protection workers involved to help decide what was in Son's best interests.

After she got Son, the foster mother shut Mother out of his life except for one hour per week of supervised visitation at the home of the foster mother supervised by her who did everything she could to hassle and anger Mother. The foster mother would not allow Son to have any personal contact with any of Mother's extended family - none.
Mother became pregnant and gave birth to her second child. She found a nice apartment that had two bedrooms one of which was reserved for Son.

In preparation for trial, Mother located a highly respected and qualified Ph.D psychologist who conducted psychological and parenting evaluations of her.

Trial in the foster mother's lawsuit began fourteen months after the first set of evaluations. The foster mother was represented by two very pretty and shapely law school seniors from the University of Minnesota Law School Clinic. They batted their eyelids, flashed their legs and said sweet nothings to Hizzoner. That proved to be far more important than the facts, the law, or even the best interests of Son.

All of the first set of evaluators told Judge Van de North that they had not had any contact with Mother for more than a year, knew nothing about her current circumstances, attitude, condition, or living arrangements, or of the training and schooling she had received, or her current state of mind. The Ph.D psychologist who had just evaluated Mother testified that Mother was fully capable of parenting Son even though she still needed some therapy, principally anger management to cope with the anger she felt in not having Son and the problems when she was allowed to visit with him.

Judge Van de North disregarded evidence that the almost sixty year old foster mother, who walked with a cane and who would be seventy years when Son was thirteen, already could not keep up with or always control Son. Acknowledged evidence of son twice needing stitches to close wounds, incidents of dangerous substances within Son's reach, and a speech impairment Son developed after he began living with the foster mother were ignored. Nor did Judge Van de North think it was significant that Son was not allowed to see his sister or extended family or was constantly torn by the tension between Mother and the foster mother, or the argument over who was his "mother."
In his opinion, Judge Van de North said that giving Son to the foster mother would give Mother more time to be a good parent to her daughter.
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The Child Protection Worker's Infant Trade
Michelle Hatcher, Assistant Hennepin County Attorney
Diane Kassler, Hennepin County Child Protection Worker
Myron S. Greenberg, Hennepin County Juvenile Court Judge


A child protection worker, with the judge's acquiescence, threatened to take a mother's unborn child from her, but offered to let her keep that child if she would give up her year old daughter and allow foster parents to adopt her.
Tragedy for Mother began in Chicago where she was born, raised in a nice home, and educated in a private school. She married young and gave birth to four beautiful children. Then came hardship. Her husband deserted her.

Unable to both support herself and her children and care for them at the same time, she became homeless. Because Mother was not adequately providing for her children, the county, rather than help Mother financially, put the children in foster care at a cost probably greater than if it had financially assisted Mother. Eventually, the county terminated Mother's parental rights to her four children.

Broken hearted by the loss of her children and inability to get them back, Mother fled to Minnesota. She settled in Minneapolis, entered into a relationship, and had a girl. But that relationship fell apart. When her youngest child was three, an accident happened. Mother's little girl was killed in a fire.

It was an accident and Mother was devastated. But she had been negligent. Losing her child was not enough of a penalty for the Hennepin County Attorney, and he prosecuted Mother for negligent homicide. Mother spent two years in jail.

She came out penniless, homeless, without any of her children, and with no one to turn to. In weakness, she turned to alcohol and drugs. This was a violation of probation and she wound up back in jail.

Released a second time, she came out determined to turn her life around. She entered into another relationship and gave birth to a girl. Even before this child was born, a Hennepin County Child Protection worker intervened and the child went directly from the hospital to a foster home.

From the beginning of her intervention, there was no doubt in the child protection worker's mind. Mother could never have custody of her latest child. After all, her parental rights to four children had been terminated, she had been in jail two times, and had a history of alcohol and drug abuse. There was no point in even trying to re-unite Mother and her youngest child. Besides, the foster parents had fallen in love with Mother's child and wanted to adopt her. The child protection worker began a proceeding in Hennepin County Juvenile Court to terminate Mother's rights to her youngest child.

But this time, Mother was not willing to give up or fail again. She obtained intensive counseling from an independent woman's drug rehabilitation service and faithfully abstained from alcohol and drug use. She got therapy from a reputable therapist. She undertook career training. Eventually, with the help of a housing counselor, she rented a nice apartment, even if it was on the third floor of an elevatorless building. And she conceived another child by the same companion who fathered the child in foster care.

Despite months of weekly tests showing she was alcohol and drug free, a continuous pattern of responsible living, and even a parenting evaluation by a respected psychologist that found her a changed person who was coping with life and capable of parenting her daughter, the child protection worker held her ground. Mother could not have custody of her daughter.

The child protection worker tried vainly to persuade Mother to give up her daughter. The foster parents, the child protection worker told Mother, lived in a very nice home in Minnetonka, could raise the child in comfort and provide her with luxuries, and even give her a college education. Wasn't that better than living in poverty?

When Mother continued to say no and stubbornly kept fighting, the Assistant Hennepin County Attorney and child protection worker told Judge Myron S. Greenberg Mother was hopeless and the county should be allowed to discontinue all services to her including the charade of working to re-unite Mother with her child. A motion to terminate all services to Mother was made orally, on the spot in a court hearing, without any notice, and with no opportunity, none, for Mother's lawyer to consider the motion or prepare a response. The motion obviously violated many rules of procedure that require it to be in writing, served at least seven days in advance, and properly scheduled. It was a major transgression of due process. But that did not faze Judge Greenberg. He granted the motion on the spot. Mother was entirely on her own.

Still she did not quit or relapse. She fought on.

As trial drew near, the child protection worker and Assistant Hennepin County attorney made another attack on Mother. They produced a report from a county laboratory that Mother, who faithfully took drug detection tests at the laboratory twice a week as required, that Mother had taken a very small amount of a drug. Mother denied that she had taken any drugs, but the child protection worker and Assistant Hennepin County Attorney would have none of that.

It mattered not that the report was completely inconsistent with other drug detection reports two days earlier and twelve hours later finding no trace of any drug, or that Mother's activities on the day of the alleged abuse (including a meeting with the child protection worker) was completely inconsistent with such use as verified by reliable witnesses who were with Mother. Nor did the child protection worker and Assistant Hennepin County Attorney accept an expert's opinion that it was inconceivable for Mother to stop at having the tiny amount reported because drug addicts cannot stop with just a little.

This time Mother won. The new judge refused to rubber stamp the county's contentions. He reserved the matter for trial when Mother would have a fair chance to refute the charges.

Now desperate, the child protection worker made an offer. If Mother would agree to give up her daughter for adoption by the foster parents, Mother could keep her soon-to-be born child. Otherwise, the child protection worker threatened, she would take that child at birth.

Mother won one more time. She was allowed to take her new son home with her and currently is caring for him - and doing an excellent job.

In February, 2004, Hennepin County agreed to reunite Mother and her daughter. After visits to make the transition comfortable for daughter, she will begin living full time with her mother and her brother at Mother’s home.

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The Family Court Officer Who Shuns Lawyers
Katherine Gearin, Ramsey County Judge
Annemarie Suchta, Ramsey County Family Court Officer

Minnesota Appeals Court Judges Bruce Willis, Robert H. Schumacher, G. Barry Anderson
Minnesota Supreme Court - Appeal denied by Justice Alan Page


The maternal grandmother of two young children sued her own daughter and her husband (Parents), then in their middle twenties, to get custody of their children. The grandmother, who had abused her daughter when she was a child, and who never liked her son-in-law, hired an attorney and started a family court proceeding to get custody. Parents had no money to pay a lawyer to represent them. However, after they learned that a Ramsey County court worker recommended in a report that grandmother get permanent custody of their children, they told the worker, a Ramsey County Family Court Officer, that they would borrow what they needed to get a lawyer. But the officer told Parents that a lawyer would do them no good in court. She refused to even meet with them if a lawyer was present.

Judge Gearin, who gave Parents only four days notice of the trial that cost them custody of their children, and only one day notice of the Family Court Officer's report and recommendations, told them they were not entitled to a lawyer even if they were too poor to afford one because it was a family court proceeding. Judge Gearin allowed the trial to go forward even though it was obvious that Parents didn't know what they were doing and could not represent themselves effectively. Judge Gearin awarded permanent custody of the children to their maternal grandmother, and stubbornly refused to change her mind even though the eight year old girl was sexually abused while in her grandmother's custody.

The Minnesota Court of Appeals, Judges Bruce Willis, Robert H. Schumacher, and G. Barry Anderson, denied Parents' appeal. They didn't care that Parents did not have and could not afford lawyer at the trial over the custody of their children, could not represent themselves effectively, and permanently lost custody of their children. They said Parents should have asked for a "continuance." the Supreme Court of Minnesota also denied Parents' appeal. They did not give a reason for doing so.
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The Suspicious Trunk Lock
Russell Platzek, Falcon Heights Prosecutor

Just after midnight on a Thursday night, city police of the City of Falcon Heights turned on their flashing lights and stopped an automobile. Falcon Heights is an almost all-white suburb of St. Paul, Minnesota. Three young black men were in the car. In their report, the officers wrote that they stopped the automobile because it had a "suspicious trunk lock." In fact, the automobile, which was over twenty years old, had no trunk lock. It had been removed, "punched out," apparently because there was no key to the trunk lock. You could open the trunk by sticking a finger in the hole and lifting the latch. One of the occupants of the car was charged with probation violation. There was a warrant for his arrest because he had not reported to his probation officer as often as required. He hired a lawyer who argued that the stop was made because of racial profiling. The court ruled that the stop made by the Falcon Heights officers violated the United States Constitution because a suspicious trunk lock was not probable cause for stopping and searching an automobile. Although he won, the cleared defendant could not recover any of the hundreds of dollars he paid his lawyer. The city prosecutor was full paid for his work in defending the illegal act of the Falcon Heights police. The officers who made the illegal stop were not penalized or punished.
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The Cursed Home
David M. Duffy, Hennepin County Judge

A Family (Mother, Father, six children) who moved from another state to Minnesota, went looking for a home. They found a home in the Minneapolis, Minnesota area that an estate had put up for sale. The home had been occupied by a woman who was an avid collector of African artifacts. People who lived nearby spoke of strange goings-on in the home. The home was filled with strange objects - wildly painted statues of animal like figures with human parts, mystical paintings, writings in incomprehensible languages, twisted shapes having no recognizable pattern, and bizarre items of clothing. It was said that some of these objects came with a curse. It also was said that the walls of the home had secrets. But Mother and Father were God fearing people who were very religious. They did not believe in curses.

The deceased woman's son ("Son") was the representative of the estate and acted on its behalf. He met with Mother and Father and they agreed on a price and all the terms of sale of the home to Family. Normally, when people buy a home, the buyers and sellers sign a purchase agreement. This is because the law requires that an agreement to buy or sell a home or land (called "real property") must be in writing. Mother and Father prepared a purchase agreement, signed it, and sent it to Son. He responded that he could not sign it. He said there were some title problems that had to be taken care of, but that it would be fixed very quickly. But Son agreed to sign a "move-in" agreement. This was in writing. It stated that Family could move in immediately while action was being taken to complete the purchase agreement.

Family moved in. It spent thousands of dollars to clean and fix up the home. A large number of friends and relatives helped them. Together, they added over $20,000 value to the home. Thirteen days after Family moved into the home, Son sent them a letter in which he demanded that they move out within ten days, and later started an unlawful detainer action to have the sheriff throw them out. Son told Family he wanted more money than they had agreed on in the written move-in agreement. What Son had not told Family is that Son's mother had borrowed a large sum of money from the Citizen's State Bank of Gaylord ("Bank"), Minnesota and that all the money Family paid for the home would go to Bank. Bank knew about the move-in agreement before it was signed, but said nothing to Family. It turns out Son was a figurehead for Bank, which wanted more money for the home than Son had agreed to. Family fought back in court. They proved that the parties had a written agreement that contained all the terms for the sale of the home to Family. Bank hired two large Minneapolis law firms to fight Family. Minneapolis Judge David M. Duffy ruled against Family. In his decision he said that neither Son nor the bank had been obligated to clear up the title problem, which they could have done in about ninety days, that offering to complete the sale if only Family would pay more money was not significant, and that there was no fraud in allowing Family to move in and greatly improve the home before telling them in only thirteen days to move out.

Family had to move out of the home and find another home. They lost all of the thousands of dollars they had spent to fix and improve the home, and the value of their work and the work of their friends, as well as thousands of dollars they spent for lawyer fees.
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Other Horror Case Digests
Below are very brief digests of other horror cases. In the future, they will be summarized in greater detail in this website or in the book.

The Family Room Floor
Ann Leslie Alton, Hennepin County Judge
A housewife convinced Judge Alton that she should not have to pay anything for a concrete floor installed by a concrete contractor and was entitled to collect over $10,000 from the contractor. She told Judge Alton that she always planned to have a bare concrete floor in her over $300,000 home so her children could come in the patio door without dirtying the carpet. The concrete floor was not as smooth as she wanted and she convinced Judge Alton the floor would be replaced - in the future.

The Slippery Verdict
Michael F. Fetsch, Ramsey County Judge
A jury found that a trucking company defrauded a truck driver by misrepresenting the condition of a truck it sold to the driver and awarded the driver damages to compensated him for his losses. Judge Fetsch threw the verdict out and made the truck driver go through another expensive jury trial because he didn't agree with the way the driver was going to report the damages awarded him in his income tax returns.

The Cabinetmaker Who Was Too Patient

Thomas R. Howe, Scott County Judge
A cabinetmaker who installed cabinets worth thousands of dollars in a model home constructed by a new home builder waited patiently for his money until the model was sold. As requested, the cabinetmaker re-worked the cabinets periodically to repair damage after walk-throughs. Even though he filed his mechanic's lien on time and met all legal requirements, Judge Howe denied the cabinetmaker any recovery because he owed the lawyer for the bank (who took over the home builders' interest) a favor.

The Unbelievable Minister
Robert H. Lynn, Hennepin County Judge
Judge Lynn disregarded the sworn deposition testimony of an ordained minister who testified that when he was a construction worker before he became a minister he saw a painter and his helper perform painting services during a certain month, which made the painter's mechanic's lien timely and enforceable. Judge Lynn, who was mad at the painter's lawyer, didn't believe the minister or the painter and his helper and threw the case out without even a trial.

The Meaningless Promise
M. Michael Monohan, Ramsey County Judge
A subcontract between a small concrete company and a company that was the general contractor for a public works project of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Council stated that, by law, the general contractor was obligated to pay its subcontractors within ten days after the general contractor was paid by the Metropolitan Council. The concrete company asked the Metropolitan Council for help after the general contractor refused to pay for work performed by the concrete company, and accepted and paid for by the Metropolitan Council (the general contractor wanted a discount). Judge Monohan agreed with the Metropolitan Council that all the law required was to put the promise in its contracts; there was no obligation to enforce the promise.

Judge Roulette
Thomas M. Murphy, Dakota County Judge
Different judges can decide the same question differently as this case shows. Whether you win or lose does not always depend on what is right but who the judge is. In this case, a Plumber filed a mechanic's lien (a legal document that states a claim against real estate) to secure a claim for money due him. Plumber had installed plumbing fixtures in an expensive newly constructed home. Because of a mistake by a county clerk, the mechanic's lien stated the wrong legal description, but also stated the correct street address. Although a law says mistakes in a mechanics lien should be ignored as long as you can identify the property, Judge Murphy told Plumber his mechanic's lien was no good and that he would rule for the other side if that side had moved for judgment. The other side moved for judgment but the case went before a different judge. That judge said Judge Murphy was wrong and ruled against the other side. the case then went before a third judge who ruled in favor of Plumber. She said it was only fair that Plumber be paid for his labor and materials. It took three judges and three years and lots of lawyer time and court costs for a judge to arrive at that conclusion concerning a claim for $15,000.

Judge Obstinacy

Michael V. Sovis, Dakota County Judge
To get the $15,000 due him as described in the case before this one, Plumber had to appear in court many times - some because the judge he was in front of was unreasonable and obstinate. Both parties in the lawsuit filed claims against the other. Plumber's claim was called a "counterclaim" because it came after the other side filed a claim against Plumber. The claims of all the parties normally are considered in the same trial because they usually are closely connected. During the time leading up to trial, there were arguments between the parties concerning discovery - the process of getting information and documents from each other to prepare for trial. Plumber moved for an order directing the other side to answer his discovery requests in accordance with the rules so he could obtain evidence to support his counterclaim. Judge Sovis denied Plumber's motion and even denied him the right to have his counterclaim heard at trial. Judge Sovis gave no reason for his rulings and did not explain why he ignored a court rule that gave Plumber the right to discovery. In a later hearing, another judge reached the opposite result and ruled that the other side had to obey the rules and respond to Plumber's discovery requests. He also scheduled trial on Plumber's counterclaim. Because of Judge Sovis, there were two trials instead of one and Plumber had to wait months more and spend more for attorneys to have his counterclaim decided. Judge Sovis never explained why he disregarded court rules.

The Little Boys Who Hated Their Father
Joanne M. Smith, Ramsey County Judge
Their start in life was troubled. They had the same mother, but different fathers. Each father was a quadriplegic bound to a wheelchair. Mother was mentally retarded and unable to provide any care for her children. She discontinued all contact with their fathers. But the two little boys, ages 4 and 6, had each other. And they had loving maternal grandparents who took them into their homes and parented them, even though grandmother had to quit work because it was too much for her. It was a warm home and the boys were normal and happy except for one problem: visitation with their fathers. Each father demanded that his son spend full weekends with him in his apartment as well as many holidays. This, after all, was their right, even if neither provided any monetary or other support for his son. Both boys hated spending time with his father and visitation greatly upset them. Their grandparents suggested visitation by both fathers in family settings such as picnics, trips to the zoo, a visit to a children's theater or museum, etc. A respected child psychologist who met extensively with both boys, and even the family court officer, recommended supervised visitation only in view of each father's circumstances in nonthreatening settings. None of that was satisfactory to the fathers or Judge Smith. Even though it created a serious financial burden on the grandparents, and whether or not it hurt the boys or brightened their lives, she ordered separate visitation for each father including visitation at a children's safety center at a cost of $50 per session with the grandparents providing all transportation - a fifty mile, four hour round trip each time.

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